What is Uveitis

Uveitis is an inflammation of the inner eye, which includes the iris, the ciliary body that holds the lens of the eye and the choroid plexus, a network of blood vessels surrounding the eyeball. Uveitis exudates into the anterior chamber and causes discoloration of the iris and a constricted, sluggish pupil.

There are many different types of uveitis because:

The term intraocular inflammation is often used to cover the spectrum of uveitis conditions. As there is this wide variety of different conditions and complications, it follows that there are numerous ways that it presents itself. The degree and type of sight loss and the type of treatment may vary considerably from patient to patient. Although the potential for confusion sounds high, as long as it is remembered that Uveitis is actually a number of different conditions, then it is possible to find out about your own particular case. It is, of course, very important, for both patients and doctors, to establish the exact type of Uveitis that exists, as far as it is possible, early on.

Another important way of classifying the different types of Uveitis is by describing the part of the eye that is affected. Very simply, there may be:

Anterior Uveitis
This affects the front of the eye, normally the iris (iritis) or the ciliary body (iridocyclitis). Iritis, strictly speaking is an older term for Anterior Uveitis but is still used frequently. Iritis is by far the most common type of Uveitis and also the most readily treated. Having said that, iritis is something that needs quite close monitoring because complications such as raised eye pressure and cataracts can occur.

Intermediate Uveitis
This affects the area just behind the ciliary body (pars plana) and also the most forward edge of the retina (see the diagram above). This is the next most common type of uveitis.

Posterior Uveitis
This is when the inflammation affects the part of the uvea at the back of the eye, the choroid. Often the retina is affected much more in this group. The choroid is basically a layer rich in small blood vessels which supplies the retina.

Diffuse uveitis is inflammation in all areas of the uvea.

What are the symptoms

With anterior uveitis, your symptoms will likely affect only one eye. You will feel mild to strong pain and will have redness and light sensitivity. Your vision may also be blurred.

Both intermediate and posterior uveitis are usually painless. Symptoms are blurred vision and floaters, typically in both eyes. Most people who develop intermediate uveitis are in their teens, 20s or 30s.

Diffuse uveitis has a combination of symptoms of all types of uveitis.

What causes Uveitis

As just suggested, there are a number of quite different types of causes of Uveitis.

It may result from an infection such as a virus (e.g. herpes) or a fungus (e.g. histoplasmosis). It may be due to a parasite such as toxoplasmosis.

It may be related to Auto-immune Disease (with or without involvement of other parts of the body). This, essentially, is when our immune system recognises a part of our own body as foreign (albeit a small part, like one type of protein).

Trauma to the eye, or even the other eye in the past, can lead to Uveitis. In many cases the cause is said to be unknown. This may well mean that the Uveitis is of the auto-immune type. The word "idiopathic" may often be used to describe this group.

How is Uveitis diagnosed

Because of the quite diverse types of causes of Uveitis and also due to the many other medical conditions associated with it, then you can expect to receive a number of tests and thorough questioning. All these are straightforward and painless enough but may seem far removed from your eye problem, e.g. back X-rays, but as said before, it is important to establish the correct type of Uveitis so that the best treatment can be planned.

How can Uveitis be treated

The treatment of Uveitis aims to achieve the following:

Like the varied nature of uveitis, the treatment of it may differ from case to case quite considerably. Corticosteroids are often the mainstay of treatment but now are, importantly, being joined by some other newer drugs, usually used along with the steroids. Various eye-drops are used, particularly to treat anterior uveitis. There is a growing confidence, especially with the newer drug treatments, that the eyesight can be stabilised over the long term. Uveitis as a disease should be regarded as incurable in the sense that it will never completely go away, but that is not to say that it can not be controlled.